Great sounds at The Waypost

Thanks to everyone who participated and made the first Muse:forward emerging music salon a big success!

The Waypost hosts Muse:forward every third Sunday.

The Waypost hosts Muse:forward every third Sunday.

We had around 40 people in the Waypost at one point, with a few people standing in the entry hall or lingering out the courtyard door to take in the performances.

Matthew Fort morphs the intense soundscape of "Chernobyl '86"

Matthew Bambas mutates the intense sonic energy of “Chernobyl ’86”

Thirteen performers in all delivered their sound-craft, which ranged from the solo piano compositions of Thomas DiNicola and Josh Kreydatus to the sonic energy-wall of Matthew’s Bambas’ “Chernobyl ’86”.

The evening began with works by composer Emyli Poltorak.  The first piece, a dance collaboration with electronic composer Nikko Geise, featured live cello antagonized by cutting and shifting electronic textures. The second, “Alpha Beta”, was composed as a music game based on letters of the alphabet, with words taken from the Wikipedia article “History of the Alphabet.

John Berendsen's robophone textures are still playing as he adds piano.

John Berendzen’s robophone textures are still playing as he adds piano.

John Berendzen then filled the room with mesmerizing layers of sound from the robophone, an instrument he invented involving a horn, an arduino processor, bluetooth, sound-looping software and other geek secrets. Not your regular stage act, the ambient experience was heightened as Berendzen meandered through the room with the instrument, shifting the way sound filled space. The audience was entranced but also encouraged to talk and move about.

The total of thirteen performers also included composers Thomas DiNicola and Josh Kreydatus performing their own works on piano, the astounding piano/saxophone McCulley-Falconer Duo, song-craft by Kela Parker, accordion-and-voice performance by Liam Barnes, some haunting guitar and vocal work by Ethan Matthews, and a little computer-rendered randomized music by composer/software-engineer (and your Muse:forward blogger) Christopher Corbell.

Emily Poltorak and friends perform her game-piece "Alpha Beta"

Emily Poltorak and friends perform her game-piece “Alpha Beta”

We couldn’t have asked for a more fun and diverse kick-off to this monthly series. More to come in June!

Muse:forward welcomes musicians and sonic artists who might not fit into a regular acoustic open mic, new band night or genre-specific jam. Ambient, experimental, compositional, improvisational and electronic works welcome. To stay in touch with this emerging community, join our  mailing list on GroupSpaces.

 

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